Category Archives: Photography

Deep in a Dream – Central Park by Michael Massaia

In the words of the artist Michael Massaia:

 I started documenting Central Park back in 2007 as way of coping with severe insomnia.  I would commonly take long walks at night, and the park always seemed to be calling me in.  I set out to document the park at its most vacant, isolating, and at times, haunting moments.  The park appears to go through a period of metamorphosis during those late night/early morning hours, and I was determined to capture it.

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© Michael Massaia
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© Michael Massaia

Alphaville by Rémy Soubanère

This series is shot in Paris suburbs by Rémy Soubanère, far from glamorous parties. Nothing is staged here, but sun never comes up…

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© Rémy Soubanère

It came from a strange undercurrent in the air in Paris these days. Sometimes it feels like reality progressed far beyond the future predicted in old dystopian movies. To pay homage to that, the name “Alphaville” is token from Jean-Luc Godard’s Noir-film classic Alphaville (1965).

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© Rémy Soubanère

Salt: Vanity by Murray Fredericks

Hamiltons presents Salt: Vanity, an exhibition of the most recent work by Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The Vanity series is a continuation of Fredericks’ renowned Salt series, in this next cycle of the project, Fredericks introduces a mirror into the previously undisturbed landscape. Australian photographer Murray Fredericks’ long relationship with Lake Eyre, where his most recent series Vanity has been produced, commenced in 2003, and to date consists of twenty journeys to the centre of the lake where he photographs for weeks at a time in the vast and infinite landscape.

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© Murray Fredericks

With the mirror being the symbol of narcissism, and vanity its driving force, Fredericks considered that the mirror be used not to reflect ‘ourselves’ and petty obsessions, but to draw the gaze outwards to the immediate environment and the cosmos; poignant given our position as humans in our current social context. Consistent with his earlier Salt pictures, the images from the Vanity series allow us access to Fredericks’ sublime experience. Through their infinite variations of colour and light, the pictures award the viewer the freedom and meditative space Murray finds essential for our release from our own vanity.

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© Murray Fredericks

 

Monuments by Mathieu Bernard-Reymond

In the words of the artist Mathieu Bernard-Reymond:

To create these Black and White photographs, I use financial charts and statistics as basic shapes to produce photographic representations of global economic and ecological concerns. The charts have been modeled using a 3D software and integrated in landscapes I photographed.  By turning these curves and sculptural shapes into massive constructions close to memorials or monumental sculptures, I intend to reach something beyond data. My purpose is to underline their fundamental link to landscape and thus, to human  and natural history. I have been working on this project since 2005.

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© Mathieu Bernard-Reymond
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© Mathieu Bernard-Reymond

Detroit: The Dream Is Now by Michel Arnaud

Detroit: The Dream Is Now is a visual essay on the rebuilding and resurgence of the city of Detroit by photographer Michel Arnaud, co-author of Design Brooklyn. In recent years, much of the focus on Detroit has been on the negative stories and images of shuttered, empty buildings—the emblems of Detroit’s financial and physical decline. In contrast, Arnaud aims his lens at the emergent creative enterprises and new developments taking hold in the still-vibrant city.

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The book explores Detroit’s rich industrial and artistic past while giving voice to the dynamic communities that will make up its future. The first section provides a visual tour of the city’s architecture and neighborhoods, while the remaining chapters focus on the developing design, art, and food scenes through interviews and portraits of the city’s entrepreneurs, artists, and makers. Detroit is the story of an American city in flux, documented in Arnaud’s thought-provoking photographs.

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Via