Tag Archives: Landscape

SKYGLOW

sky·glow
/skī’glō’/
noun
brightness of the night sky in a built-up area as a result of light pollution

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After a grueling three-year journey of over 150,000 miles traveled and 3,000,000 pictures taken, renowned timelapse filmmakers Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan are proud to introduce SKYGLOW; a hardcover photo book and timelapse video series exploring North America’s remaining magnificent night skies and the grave threat of light pollution to our fragile environment. SKYGLOW explores the history and mythology of celestial observation, the proliferation of electrical outdoor lighting that spurred the rise of the phenomena known as “skyglow,” and the Dark Sky Movement that’s fighting to reclaim the night skies.

 

Find out more about SKYGLOW here.

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Zima: The Powerful Beauty of Russian Winter

In the words of the artist Elena Chernyshova:

There is no aesthetic like the Russian winter. Yes, it can be grey and dull at times, but at its height, it completely reconfigures the environment. The universal white cover fills the land with a pure, magical beauty, full of dignity and mystery.

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© Elena Chernyshova

According to an old saying, truth, in reality, is white, sparkling, frosty cold, silent and endless: something like the boundless Siberian tundra landscape.

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© Elena Chernyshova

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Salt: Vanity by Murray Fredericks

Hamiltons presents Salt: Vanity, an exhibition of the most recent work by Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The Vanity series is a continuation of Fredericks’ renowned Salt series, in this next cycle of the project, Fredericks introduces a mirror into the previously undisturbed landscape. Australian photographer Murray Fredericks’ long relationship with Lake Eyre, where his most recent series Vanity has been produced, commenced in 2003, and to date consists of twenty journeys to the centre of the lake where he photographs for weeks at a time in the vast and infinite landscape.

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© Murray Fredericks

With the mirror being the symbol of narcissism, and vanity its driving force, Fredericks considered that the mirror be used not to reflect ‘ourselves’ and petty obsessions, but to draw the gaze outwards to the immediate environment and the cosmos; poignant given our position as humans in our current social context. Consistent with his earlier Salt pictures, the images from the Vanity series allow us access to Fredericks’ sublime experience. Through their infinite variations of colour and light, the pictures award the viewer the freedom and meditative space Murray finds essential for our release from our own vanity.

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© Murray Fredericks

 

Layer Drawings by Nobuhiro Nakanishi

In the words of the artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi:

This series portrays changes that take place in everyday life, like the sun rising or ice cream melting. These ordinary events were photographed at regular intervals, printed on transparent film and assembled in sequence. Capturing the accumulation of time as a sculpture allows the viewer to experience the ephemerality of time.

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We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way. Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.

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The Landscape Photography of Brendan Pattengale

Brendan Pattengale (b. 1984) is an American photographer. Taking up the tradition of landscape photography to situate his musings, Pattengale probes photographic methods as well as the truth in color perception. His photographs are strikingly abstract, psychedelic in the way that they vividly depict valleys and vistas, yet they maintain a certain realism in the subject matter.

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© Brendan Pattengale

Utilizing an unorthodox set of tools to capture his chosen terrain—Pattengale travels to the far reaches of the world to find new sceneries—he calls into question the role of the camera as vicarious viewer relative to an image making process that involves other mechanical and non-mechanical agents. As was said by Goethe in his Theory of Colors, colors belong to the eye; Pattengale conveys this in his images, which are entirely true in their retelling of light and, therefore, vision, while they are also altered in their process prior to the instant of the photograph.

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© Brendan Pattengale

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