Tag Archives: Landscape

Salt: Vanity by Murray Fredericks

Hamiltons presents Salt: Vanity, an exhibition of the most recent work by Australian photographer Murray Fredericks. The Vanity series is a continuation of Fredericks’ renowned Salt series, in this next cycle of the project, Fredericks introduces a mirror into the previously undisturbed landscape. Australian photographer Murray Fredericks’ long relationship with Lake Eyre, where his most recent series Vanity has been produced, commenced in 2003, and to date consists of twenty journeys to the centre of the lake where he photographs for weeks at a time in the vast and infinite landscape.

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© Murray Fredericks

With the mirror being the symbol of narcissism, and vanity its driving force, Fredericks considered that the mirror be used not to reflect ‘ourselves’ and petty obsessions, but to draw the gaze outwards to the immediate environment and the cosmos; poignant given our position as humans in our current social context. Consistent with his earlier Salt pictures, the images from the Vanity series allow us access to Fredericks’ sublime experience. Through their infinite variations of colour and light, the pictures award the viewer the freedom and meditative space Murray finds essential for our release from our own vanity.

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© Murray Fredericks

 

Layer Drawings by Nobuhiro Nakanishi

In the words of the artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi:

This series portrays changes that take place in everyday life, like the sun rising or ice cream melting. These ordinary events were photographed at regular intervals, printed on transparent film and assembled in sequence. Capturing the accumulation of time as a sculpture allows the viewer to experience the ephemerality of time.

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We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way. Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.

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Images and text via additional images via

The Landscape Photography of Brendan Pattengale

Brendan Pattengale (b. 1984) is an American photographer. Taking up the tradition of landscape photography to situate his musings, Pattengale probes photographic methods as well as the truth in color perception. His photographs are strikingly abstract, psychedelic in the way that they vividly depict valleys and vistas, yet they maintain a certain realism in the subject matter.

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© Brendan Pattengale

Utilizing an unorthodox set of tools to capture his chosen terrain—Pattengale travels to the far reaches of the world to find new sceneries—he calls into question the role of the camera as vicarious viewer relative to an image making process that involves other mechanical and non-mechanical agents. As was said by Goethe in his Theory of Colors, colors belong to the eye; Pattengale conveys this in his images, which are entirely true in their retelling of light and, therefore, vision, while they are also altered in their process prior to the instant of the photograph.

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© Brendan Pattengale

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Winter In Squares by Kilian Schönberger

In the words of the artist Kilian Schönberger:

A winter trip through rural Central Europe. Snow, frost and ice have transformed the landscape, everything appears like an ink drawing. The colors are fading, contrasts between dark and light dominate the visual occurrence. A concatenation of quiet and vast scenes, a trip with many stopovers, discovering the new and the known. Nature seems to stagnate during winter, an all through romantic view. Meanwhile the world is changing, but nature romanticism is nowadays again our hidden shelter where the mind escapes from the upheavals of the reality. Locations: Germany, from the coast to the Alps.

kilianschoenberger.de | @kilianschoenberger instagram
© Kilian Schönberger
kilianschoenberger.de | @kilianschoenberger instagram
© Kilian Schönberger

 

This Land is Your Land by Barry Underwood

Inspired by the famous folk tune, “This Land is Your Land” written by Woody Guthrie, Barry Underwood’s series affirms his standing as an environmentalist photographer and ecological advocate. Written in 1940, the song’s original lyrics introduced a critical perspective to the idealistic view of America as Underwood’s images challenge the common bucolic perception of the landscape.

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© Barry Underwood

Underwood marks the landscape with LED lights, luminescent substances and other physical processes, utilizing lustrous color and working with shapes, lines and light to point to the immutable traces that human interventions leave behind. By staging a visual disruption in an otherwise familiar setting, Underwood seeks to reveal the unseen potential instilled in the landscape. As a result of the interplay of the natural and unnatural, he creates strikingly beautiful, otherworldly visuals enhancing awareness of environmental issues.

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© Barry Underwood

He writes, “The landscape has been and continues to be altered by ambitious human activities linked to political, social, economic, climactic, and aesthetic forces. I am particularly interested in connections between land use and the interpretation of a landscape as a politically symbolic environment, reflecting human activity and one’s own self-definition, as well as our values and beliefs.”

From the exhibition at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery.